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Pugsley
01-06-2011, 09:02 AM
Do monitor calibrators (I'm looking at the Spyder3Pro) adjust brightness and contrast?

And do the calibrators ever need calibrating?

Thanks in advance

IanB
01-06-2011, 09:09 AM
I take it you don't like the way the calibration has turned out

Pugsley
01-06-2011, 09:34 AM
No. I'm still pondering whether to get one.
I'm hoping the calibrator will be a one shot marvel that does the lot.
My main problem is when I put images on a different computer the brightness levels seem to be the most obvious difference

Dr Neo Lao
01-06-2011, 11:05 AM
I may be totally wrong here, but:

As far as I can tell, the reason for calibrating a monitor is for printing. The goal being to get what you see on the screen to match what you see on the print.

Different monitors on different systems will always look slightly different unless they are the same make and model and calibrated with the same tool. Even moving the head around can make an image look different on the screen. So if you want to make your image look the same on different computers then a calibration tool won't help you.

But like I said, I could be wrong (it's happened before... )

IanB
01-06-2011, 11:29 AM
No. I'm still pondering whether to get one.
i don't have one and I don't think weekenders really need one. The best test is to get a photo printed WITHOUT CORRECTIONS by a good lab and see how the photos compare with your screen image and then you can adjust monitors to match

have a look in the monitor forum as there are lots of ideas in there

I have found it hard to match my lappy up the external monitor; something I could do with the old PC

Don't forget the lighting in the room/s will effect how a photo looks. The best viewing is in a room with no natural light at all as that light will be changing all the time

Pugsley
01-06-2011, 11:46 AM
As far as I can tell, the reason for calibrating a monitor is for printing. The goal being to get what you see on the screen to match what you see on the print.



True. I want to have confidence that what I see on my screen is what I get when I take my pictures to get printed at Teds.
Of course that raises the question of how good the labs are calibrated.

Also a lot of my pix I email out, so I want to make sure they are good on other people's screens.
I know I cant control other peoples screens but at least I can make sure I've done my bit to ensure good quality

IanB. all good points.
I photographed my daughter's wedding (as 2nd shooter to my other daughter) on the weekend and am trying to go a bit further as there will be lots of request for pix

Damo77
02-06-2011, 03:48 PM
Do monitor calibrators (I'm looking at the Spyder3Pro) adjust brightness and contrast?
No, sorry. You'll need to get the Elite for that, or the i1Display2. None of the cheaper models control brightness.

Chuckdup
02-06-2011, 04:34 PM
I'll sell you mine. Pretty sure its a pro. I really dont have a use for it. It was for my laptop, but I dont use it for editing.

Daniel Hancox
02-06-2011, 04:57 PM
Hi Guys

Main reason for calibration is to see accurate colour on the screen, so you know the photo you have taken, will be replicated as close as possible to the image you see on a screen. If you calibrate to a set colour space you took the photo in. There are set standards for calibration such as ICC and Fogra, so if Teds have the ability to print to these standards, you should be able to send them your calibrated profile to print from. Works similar to Digital softproofing.

Pugsley
03-06-2011, 10:09 PM
No, sorry. You'll need to get the Elite for that, or the i1Display2. None of the cheaper models control brightness.

Thank you Damien.

Thanks for the offer Dazza. I'm still deciding what to get.

Daniel, I agree, but brightness needs to be calibrated as well or else if picture is printed e.g. dark, then doesnt matter how good the colour is as picture wont turn out as shown on your screen.

Brougham
03-06-2011, 11:29 PM
The spyder3 pro has the option for brightness and contrast.

IanB
04-06-2011, 09:31 AM
The spyder3 pro has the option for brightness and contrast.

so do my eyes when looking at my lab screen test images and the photos the lab supplied. Most brightnes/colour dramas can be adjusted via the dials on monitor; lappies are a bit harder.

northerner
04-06-2011, 11:25 AM
all I do is to photograph someone in normal light with preference on a fair bit of skin showing, then place it on the mac, print out a 6x4 and check skin tone (at the time, as we all know skin coloration varies from warm to almost transparent) against photo and screen, any adjustments can then be made in either monitor or printer in relevance to the outcome, I stick with skin tone on the monitor and adjust the printer until I'm happy

screen appearance is only one step to "true to life" pic's

elevation and angle of monitor screen, lighting in the viewing room, eye degradation at the time of viewing and cleanliness of glasses (wine or spirit)

all come into play to affect the final outcome and all are subject to change, I find with my method the final outcome is not too far away from a "reasonable" outcome

I have used the online calibrators as a starting point!

I also borrowed my sons spider to check as well!

Daniel Hancox
16-06-2011, 01:00 PM
Hi Mate

I am biassed obviously as I use the SpectraView 2 software, but the brightness level should be wrapped up in the calibration of colour space. Viewing the results after calibartion and the image on screen will tell you if you are happy with the results. If you are not happy with the brightness you have full control to adjust this and then still calibrate to your preffered colour space. Brightness, Contrast and colour space are all considered.

Damo77
16-06-2011, 01:03 PM
The spyder3 pro has the option for brightness and contrast.
That's not my understanding. It has a rough visual guide for brightness, but you can't actually specify a numeric brightness target.

Daniel Hancox
20-06-2011, 02:36 PM
You can pick your cdm2 either 140 or less etc, most photographers go prity low brightness 100 or even less. you can also pick your white point, contrast, Gamma Curve, or build a custom curve. Most people just use the presets though, for photographic editing, it is 140cdm2, D65, at 2.20.

Damo77
20-06-2011, 02:48 PM
Are you sure you're not talking about the Elite? This comparison chart (http://spyder.datacolor.com/s3compare.php) doesn't suggest that the Pro can do brightness. Happy to be proven wrong, though.

140 is a ridiculously high luminance, by the way. You'd need to have football stadium floodlights in your office to get print matching at that brightness.

Daniel Hancox
20-06-2011, 04:17 PM
Hi Damo

Sorry mate, I think there is some confusion I was talking about the SpectraView 2 calibration software. If you go to the Image Science site they have a prity comprehensive review of the software.

I agree about the brightness, but hey that's why you need to be able to fully customise your calibration.