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Damo77
27-04-2010, 02:56 PM
I'm quite passionate about monitor calibration, and I figure if you're enthusiastic enough to take great photos, you should be enthusiastic enough to want to see, edit and print them accurately.

I submit this brief article: What's the purpose of monitor calibration? (http://damiensymonds.blogspot.com/2010/01/whats-purpose-of-monitor-calibration.html)

Calibrators range from cheap to expensive, and there's a device available that will suit everyone.

If you purchase the excellent i1 Display 2 device from X-Rite, here are some instructions for you:
My own: link (http://www.damiensymonds.com.au/art_cal1.html)
The lovely Sarah Wilkerson's: link (http://www.pixelationblog.com/?p=350)
Image Science's: link (http://www.imagescience.com.au/kb/questions/86/How%20to%20use%20an%20Eye%20One%20Display%20calibr ator)

If you purchase the cheap but reputable Spyder3Express, there's a good tute here (http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/reviews/profiling/spyder3express_1.html).

If you purchase the terrific Spyder3Elite, there's some great instructions here (http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/spyder3elite.htm). You can also go here (http://www.video.bhphotovideo.com/?fr_story=6705482e45f83bfb581744e6bbf1bee3836e657f&rf=bm) and search by "Datacolor" or "Spyder".

If anybody knows of tutorials for other devices, please add them to the list.

~Raven~
27-04-2010, 03:29 PM
Thank you Damien....I will have a more thorough read when the kids are in bed.

MDSimpson
27-04-2010, 03:54 PM
Damo, seeing as how we have the new Calibration forum, I'll add this as a sticky so we can all read the links.

Thanks

Papou
27-04-2010, 05:47 PM
Top addition:)!!!..

Damo77
21-09-2010, 05:46 PM
Update: I've written the most comprehensive article I could manage: All about monitor calibration (http://damiensymonds.blogspot.com/2010/09/all-about-monitor-calibration.html)

IanB
21-09-2010, 06:00 PM
Thanks Damien; but no test photos?? :rolleyes:

CSFS
04-02-2011, 10:51 AM
Cool I've been thinking about this - I read a 'comprehensive' how to last week, basically told you to print an image with natural tones then use this to calibrate by eye, but if your monitor is out, how do you know what you are printing...??? :rolleyes:

Damo77
04-02-2011, 12:35 PM
I read a 'comprehensive' how to last week, basically told you to print an image with natural tones then use this to calibrate by eye
Where did you read this? On the internet, or on some papyrus? Direct screen-to-print calibration hasn't been accepted practice for years.

CSFS
04-02-2011, 12:44 PM
Where did you read this? On the internet, or on some papyrus? Direct screen-to-print calibration hasn't been accepted practice for years.

On the interwebs so it must be true :p

burgo
04-02-2011, 01:33 PM
I found this free program -http://www.calibrize.com/

Daniel Hancox
19-05-2011, 04:25 PM
Hi Guys

There is a huge difference between doing a soft calibration such as using the software that comes with your Colour Sensor, and a monitor which does not have a programmable LUT. You are basically using the graphics card to calibrate which means, if you are for instance calibrating to Adobe RGB you will be missing colour in the Adobe RGB Gamma Curve. If you do direct Hardware calibration via the monitors LUT, these colours are not missed, so your work flow will be a lot more accurate. Using standard panel woth TN panels will also over saturate your colours, and will not give you acurate colour, your viewing angles will also be way off.

Damo77
19-05-2011, 05:24 PM
There is a huge difference between doing a soft calibration such as using the software that comes with your Colour Sensor, and a monitor which does not have a programmable LUT. You are basically using the graphics card to calibrate which means, if you are for instance calibrating to Adobe RGB you will be missing colour in the Adobe RGB Gamma Curve. If you do direct Hardware calibration via the monitors LUT, these colours are not missed, so your work flow will be a lot more accurate. Using standard panel woth TN panels will also over saturate your colours, and will not give you acurate colour, your viewing angles will also be way off.
What you say is true to a degree, but I hasten to clarify that it belongs in the same category of truth as statements such as "Luxury European cars provide the safest and most enjoyable driving experience".

No doubt they are, and we'd all love to own a luxury European car, but not many people can afford it, so we settle for whatever is within our budget. And here's the point - they get us from A to B. Maybe not 100% luxuriously, but we end up at our destination.

Likewise with monitors. For anybody reading this who, like me, can't afford a massive NEC Spectraview or whatever, I encourage you to keep saving for your dream monitor, but be satisfied in the knowledge that any screen (yes, even TN ones) will do a satisfactory job for you in the meantime. Just make sure it's hardware-calibrated, with a device such as a Spyder or an i1.

Daniel's post is well-intentioned, but shouldn't be cause for alarm among those of us with thin wallets :)

Daniel Hancox
23-05-2011, 02:49 PM
I understand people have budgets, but if you spend 10K for instance on your camera gear and editing suits, it's like putting a farrari engine in a Gemini. A great Photo is only as good as it's reproduction, and this is where acuracy is nessesasary. The panel and calibration ability I believe is just as important as the camera and lens you use. If you look at what the Europeans are doing in regards to calibration we are about 3-Years behind. Anyway just my point of view...

Damo77
23-05-2011, 02:59 PM
I completely agree, insofar as if people spend big dollars on top-of-the-line cameras and lenses, then they'd be fools not to do the same on their monitor. But this isn't just a forum for high-end pros, there are plenty of beginners here too. It's important to keep that in perspective.

Daniel Hancox
23-05-2011, 03:25 PM
All good mate, I understand calibration for beginners can be very confusing.

landyvlad
21-03-2014, 03:43 PM
Having just found this I agree with the last post

Can laptop screens be calibrated? Can the devices required be rented or borrowed?

IanB
21-03-2014, 04:03 PM
Having just found this I agree with the last post

Can laptop screens be calibrated? Can the devices required be rented or borrowed?

I was going to mention the external screen in those recent PMs but thought you had enough on your mind for now.

Yes and no. lappies are not the best imo for serious edited. Just a slight change in screen angle can change everything.

As for serious editing we also need a room with consistent lighting---i have a heavy blanket over the window behind me


I still use my visual calibration and that's close enough for me.

landyvlad
22-03-2014, 12:46 PM
Yee-ouch ! I did try moving the screen back and forth angle wise and it made a HUGE difference to the quality and look of the pic so I can certainly see where that would be the limiting factor in trying to do PP.

I have a screen from a desktop computer, would I be better plugging that in and using it when PP ?

Ian what do you mean by visual calibration?

IanB
22-03-2014, 02:48 PM
I have a screen from a desktop computer, would I be better plugging that in and using it when PP ?


give it a good see what happens.





Ian what do you mean by visual calibration?

I have digital images and printed photos from a lab (http://www.blackandwhitephoto.com.au/premium-services/calibration). Just a matter of matching it all up, not easy and it takes a bit of practise/experience. If web photos--pro-photography sites-- look about right your computer is about right and most likely close enough.

Calibration is only really needed when printing photos

Even if our screens are perfectly calibrated we still need to be able to read the colours/density of the photo on the screen. Again that takes practise and experience.

Have a look at the first image and what can see wrong? No cheating; just look at first image

70323











Now can you see the difference?

70324

yep it was green and I pretty well missed that until I was about to post the photo. Just a little magenta need for my screen but I bit there are others saying to colour is not perfect.

Now while I was typing the last few words I thought I should do another little fiddle to fix the plants stems

70326

Now flick between the three images and see how each changes. [click on the first image>>click on next>> click on first>> now just keep clicking to change the images quickly.

BTW: if we don't have another image to compare a image with it can be very hard to see what is 'incorrect'

Test your eye>fine something blue>>remember that colour>>now find something thing else to match that blue colour>>now put the two together. The paint or picture framing shop is great to find the colours

BTW; we can't remember colours perfectly and there are a lot of shades and tones of blue ;)

landyvlad
22-03-2014, 05:03 PM
Yep once I was able to click between them quickly I can see what you mean !